CBEIP Horses

Equine Interactive Professional Certification

Both equine interactive mental heath professionals and equine interactive education professionals need to be able demonstrate competent level of training, education and experience in providing equine interactive services. The Certification Board for Equine Interactive Professions Certification is the flagship certification safeguarding the public of the practitioners qualifications to offer equine interactive therapy and services.

Benefits of Certification Board for Equine Interactive Professions CBEIP Certification 

Professional Distinction – Certification provides documented evidence of examination by an independent certifying organization and demonstrates high level of knowledge about the specialized field of equine assisted interaction.

Certification is identified by the public as signifying professionalism, specialized training and knowledge in the field of equine assisted interaction.

As work with equines in mental health and education becomes more readily identifiable by the public, credentials such as the CEIP will assist professionals to establish their credibility.

Commercial General Liability Insurance – Coverage with Markel Insurance Company is available to Certified Equine Interaction Professionals whether they own, lease, use their own facility, or are independent contractors traveling to other locations to practice equine assisted therapy or education.

Cristina Rennie MA RCCI – This Certification  shows clients that professionals are wanting to hold high standards in the work and therefore gives people more information about the field and the qualifications a person has… related to informed consent, scope of practice and ethics. – Cristina Rennie MA RCC , BC Canada, www.shamrockcounselling.com

Ann Alden, MA, CEIP-ED – I took this exam when it was first offered and have renewed it once already. I highly recommend it because it is independent of any model or organization. Instead it is independently tested in a way that allows the applicant to demonstrate their knowledge, experience and competence in providing equine-human interactions. I missed a few questions primarily because I have been out of graduate school so long I think. I would personally much prefer to send someone to a practitioner who has this type of certification than one that is limited to one model or type of approach to working with horses to help people. I took the test at a small aviation center near the Tucson airport and was given 2 hours to finish it, more than I needed. – Ann Alden, MA, CEIP-ED, PATH International Certified Instructor and Equine Specialist in Mental, Health and Learning., Sonoita, AZ, Www.borderlandscenter.com

CBEIP Certification – Study Guide

By Barbara Rector

In answer to questions on what to study for the domains of competency covered in the CBEIP exam. Here are some ideas that will help as you prepare to take the exam. The administrative and horses questions specific to experiential education and/or mental health is best done from my perspective through review of your common sense practices offering your services with the help of horses.

There undoubtedly are cultural influences imbedded in the questions just as there are different ways of keeping horses humanely depending on your area of the country or world.

Best to review the Adult D level Pony Cub curriculum or your favorite book that offers basic skills of horsemanship information. http://tinyurl.com/a4tkpto

Watch the videos on line of the horse behaviors put out by Penn State at The New Bolton Center.

Review the Standards and Safety Guidelines, just read as if a novel of: PATH Intl, ACRIP or the Pony Club.

Review your particular basic text used when studying experiential education and/or mental health. There are several good suggestions from the CBEIP Handbook in the References list located at the back.

I urge everyone who meets the qualifications for sitting the exam to have a go at it. Don’t worry about passing. You may miss a number of the questions and still pass, (80% is required to pass), and you can take the test over until a passing grade is achieved.

If you don’t understand a question or believe there is no good answer, make note of it. Write your rational for your answer and send it to the CBEIP Board to pass along to the Question Developers. It may be that the question requires re-wording or clarification with better references, in which case you may not lose points for an incorrect answer.

Barbara Rector MA, CEIP-ED,
Adventures In Awareness™
520.247.3383
info@adventuresinawareness.net

To find out more about CBEIP Certification please go to their web site http://www.cbeip.com

kelly teaching

Gratitude and Praise to Teachers – Revisited

As another school year comes to an end, I would like to take a moment to give Praise and Gratitude to all the Teachers that nurtured, guided and provided tough love to our children throughout the past school year.

Our Gratitude is especially important this year as many states education systems are faced with massive funding shortages and one of our nations most precious resources – our teachers – come face to face with job loss, over crowed classrooms, and dwindling resources. Our teachers deserve better and each person CAN make a difference by telling our teachers “Thank you for give of yourself to my child”

I first posted this article at the beginning of the 2010 school year and of all my blog post it has consistently receives hit after hit, so I though it appropriate to re-post it at the close of this school year. And to encourage every person to make a special effort to be sure to say Thank You to our teachers.

All of us know first hand the impact teachers had on us growing up, but few of us know the loving sacrifice teachers freely make daily.

For the past five years, I have had the honor of a “backstage pass” into the real lives of teachers because I’ve watched my daughter, Kelly, serve as an elementary school teacher. Through her experience, I have personally witnessed the joys teaching has brought to her and I also understand the stressful challenges she has to balance in her life.

When I began writing this, I was instantly taken back to the year Kelly’s class had five special needs students she lovingly called “her boys.” When you entered Kelly’s classroom that year, you not only saw and heard 20+ students clamoring for attention, seeking answers to questions and desiring guidance – all of which every teacher faces daily – you also got a glimpse into the very different world of Autism as it walked hand-in-hand with a mainstream classroom. Kelly soon found herself performing a daily dance that combined the needs of her regular students with the poor communication skills, poor social awareness and challenging behavioral characteristics of Autism. The tapestry woven between teacher and students was amazing – but it came at the price of stressful days, emotional exhaustion and tremendous fatigue . . . A price I know Kelly would lovingly pay again.

Objectively, teaching has got to be one of the top 5 most stressful careers in the world.

So many teachers are at school early and stay late, they correct papers and plan instruction on evenings and weekends — working hard to meet the educational needs of students, some of whom struggle to make progress despite the stress of life. Teachers also buy materials with money from their own pockets and volunteer their time to attend school carnivals and sporting events while also attending workshops and training to continually develop their own skills. I assure you they don’t do all this for the money.

They do it because they care about your child.

As another school year comes to an end, now is an appropriate time to remind everyone to continuously thank the effective and dedicated teachers in our schools.

Yes, teachers make all the difference.

If you would like Dr. Kay Trotter to come talk to your group or find out more about her counseling practice, you can contact her at: Kay@KayTrotter.com214-499-0396, or visit her web site http://www.KayTrotter.com.

Dr Trotter also post regularly in her FaceBook fan page http://www.facebook.com/DrKaySudekumTrotter.

Car DVD

Does your child watch DVDs in the Car? It could be hurting their vocabulary?

No DVD Please

By Laura Hickman

Guest Author – Laura Hickman lives in Linden, VA and is a homeschool mom of 4 children, aged 6-12.  She graduated from The George Washington University in 1992 with a degree in Business Administration and a minor in Psychology.  She is an aspiring Equine Specialist and hopes to have her own farm in the near future.

Four years ago, we decided it was time to purchase a new vehicle for our family of six.  After weeks of researching the type of vehicle, it was time to negotiate price and options!  There were only two things I knew I had to have, and one of them, to the astonishment of our dealer, was NOT a DVD player!

With four active kids “test driving” each car in the showroom, our salesman must have thought we’d lost our minds!  After all, weren’t TV the greatest babysitter and bearer of peace known to parent-kind?  Conceptually, I’d have to agree.  Television IS a convenient device for the tired and mentally weary parent.  And maybe, even more so for the tired, weary, home school parent of multiple children!

Obviously, there are good, wholesome educational programs available.  But if we are constantly plugging our children into a TV, or any electronic device for that matter, what are we teaching them?  What are they missing?

I contend that we are teaching them at least two things.  First, we are teaching them to just do the easy thing.  Reading, thinking and communicating are work!  A child has to not only learn to decode 26 symbols in a dizzying number of combinations, but he or she has to put those seemingly random combinations into context, and finally, they have to take the context of the material and apply it to themselves.  “What does this mean to me?”  With TV, all the work is done for them.  They are told what the pictures are and what the information should mean to them.  The TV becomes their source of truth, rather than mom and dad.

Secondly, I believe we are teaching them that they are not worthy of our investment.  As parents we are all tired at the end of the day.  Whether we spent the day in the workforce, or whether we spent the day educating our own children at home.  We are not as young as we used to be and constantly answering questions and repeatedly disciplining for the same behavior is mentally exhausting.  We want ‘mommy time’!

There is a time and a place for ‘mommy time’, (or ‘daddy time’ as the case may be) but as with all things, it must be in balance with our responsibilities as parents

As we are driving along, I grab the disk case, slide the disk into the player and breathe a deep sigh of relief as peace settles over the van.  Another audio-book begins to work its magic.

‘An audio-book?’ you question.  You’d be surprised how well they will capture the attention of your children.  Not only will you experience peace and quiet as they are drawn into the story, but your kids will benefit as well.  There have been many a time when my youngest boy garnered praises from complete strangers.  The first time was just before he turned 4.  The Staples employee, with whom he had struck up a conversation, could not believe he was able to have such a coherent conversation at age 3!!  I think he must have been explaining centrifugal force (his favorite conversation starter at the time).

Does this mean we never watch movies in the van?  Of course not!  But we do limit it to long trips (more than 2 hours), and we limit the number of movies allowed.  But by not having a permanent DVD player in the van it is much less tempting for me to give into their desire to watch TV wherever we go!!

tamberly

Gratitude and Praise to Teachers

As everyone heads back to school, I would like to take a moment to give Praise and Gratitude to all the Teachers that parents have entrusted to care for their most precious children.

All of us know first hand the impact teachers had on us growing up, but few of us know the loving sacrifice teachers freely make on a daily basis.

For the past four years, I have had the honor of a “backstage pass” into the real lives of teachers because I’ve watched my daughter, Kelly, serve as an elementary school teacher. Through her experience, I have personally witnessed the joys teaching has brought to her and I also understand the stressful challenges she has to balance in her life.

When I began writing this, I was instantly taken back to the year Kelly’s class had five special needs students she lovingly called “her boys.” When you entered Kelly’s classroom that year, you not only saw and heard 20+ students clamoring for attention, seeking answers to questions and desiring guidance – all of which every teacher faces daily – you also got a glimpse into the very different world of Autism as it walked hand-in-hand with a mainstream classroom. Kelly soon found herself performing a daily dance that combined the needs of her regular students with the poor communication skills, social awareness and behavioral characteristics of Autism. The tapestry woven between teacher and students was amazing – but it came at the price of stressful days, emotional exhaustion and tremendous fatigue . . . A price I know Kelly would lovingly pay again. Objectively, teaching has got to be one of the top 5 most stressful careers in the world.

Comedian Bill Cosby knows the importance of teachers and, in fact, attributes his own phenomenal success to a teacher. As a sixth-grade student in Philadelphia, he was inspired by his teacher, Mary Forchic, to follow his dreams of becoming an entertainer. Recognizing his natural storytelling abilities, she suggested “you should become either a lawyer or an actor because you lie so well.” Forchic has remained one of Cosby’s lifelong friends and Cosby has devoted a great deal of his time to ensure that all children have the opportunity to benefit from teachers like Forchic.  We could all follow Cosby’s lead and express our gratitude for the enormous contributions that dedicated teachers make to our childrens’ lives and to our community.

So many teachers are at school early and stay late, they correct papers and plan instruction on evenings and weekends — working hard to meet the educational needs of students, some of whom struggle to make progress despite the stress of life. Teachers also buy materials with money from their own pockets and volunteer their time to attend school carnivals and sporting events while also attending workshops and training to continually develop their own skills. I assure you they don’t do all this for the money.

They do it because they care about your child.

As another school year gets underway, now is an appropriate time to remind everyone to continuously thank the effective and dedicated teachers in our schools.

Yes, teachers make all the difference.

If you would like Dr. Kay Trotter to come talk to your group or find out more about her counseling practice, you can contact her at: Kay@KayTrotter.com214-499-0396, or visit her web site http://www.KayTrotter.com.

Dr Trotter also post regularly in her FaceBook fan page http://www.facebook.com/DrKaySudekumTrotter.